Bill for 50% Renewable Energy by 2030 will spur state’s jobs, economy 

Annapolis, Md. - Solar industry leaders and advocates celebrated today as the Maryland state lawmakers passed the Clean Energy Jobs Act or CEJA (SB 516 / HB 1158), which will now move to the desk of Governor Larry Hogan. The bill, which passed with a 95-40 vote in the House and 31-15 in the Senate, will put Maryland on track to achieving a 50 percent renewable energy goal by 2030, including a 14.5 percent carve-out for solar energy, and requires Maryland to examine pathways to 100 percent clean energy by 2040.

Maryland Clean Energy Jobs Act advocates

“The Governor has an opportunity to bring back the 900 solar jobs lost over the last two years. Furthermore, CEJA shows companies like Amazon, Facebook, and  Microsoft - all of which have committed to 100% renewable energy - that we're open for business,” said David Murray, Executive Director of the Maryland- DC-Virginia Solar Energy Industries Association (MDV-SEIA). “We are pleased this bill passed with amendments from both Democrats and Republicans, and is supported by 64% of Marylanders.”

"We are thrilled to see Maryland helping lead the nation’s transition to cost-competitive, job-creating clean energy with today’s votes,” said Pari Kasotia, Vote Solar’s director of Mid-Atlantic states. “We thank state lawmakers, clean energy advocates, local businesses, environmental justice leaders, and the many others who have led this multi-year effort to put Maryland on track to a thriving clean energy economy. Bipartisan majorities of Maryland voters want more renewable energy powering our communities and our economy, and we encourage Governor Hogan to immediately sign this important legislation.”

“We applaud the Maryland legislature for taking bold action to expand solar energy in the state and strengthen the economy,” said Nicole Sitaraman, Senior Manager of Public Policy at Sunrun. “With Governor Hogan’s signature, we can get to work bringing more good-quality, local jobs to the state and more energy choice for all Marylanders.”

The Clean Energy Jobs Act will stimulate Maryland’s clean energy economy and in-state electricity generation, helping spur well-paying jobs, drawing billions in local investments, and making the Old Line State attractive to major corporations and businesses committed to procuring 100% renewable energy. The Clean Energy Jobs Act will result in approximately 20,000 new solar jobs and also build Maryland’s growing offshore wind workforce, enabling 5,700 development, manufacturing, and construction jobs and drive billions in direct investment in Maryland’s economy. It would also bring in approximately $247 million in federal investment tax credits in just one year..

The solar groups note that the economic and jobs benefits of the Clean Energy Jobs Act are too large to ignore. Maryland already lost 800 solar jobs in 2018. These are local, good-paying jobs that Maryland cannot afford to continue to lose. The groups are urging Governor Hogan to join neighboring states of New Jersey, New York, and the District of Columbia in expanding the clean energy standard and strengthening Maryland’s clean energy economy.

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About MDV-SEIA: The Maryland- DC-Virginia Solar Energy Industries Association represents solar installers, developers and manufacturers throughout Maryland, D.C., Delaware, and Virginia. The association analyzes and communicates the market impacts of state and local energy policy, and helps to shape these policies in the region. MDV-SEIA’s leadership has resulted in expanding community solar programs, increasing state-level incentives, and providing education to further expand development and access to clean energy technologies. Visit us at www.mdvseia.org

About Vote Solar: Since 2002, Vote Solar has been working to lower solar costs and expand solar access. A 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Vote Solar advocates for state policies and programs needed to repower our electric grid with clean energy. Learn more at www.votesolar.org

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